Welcome to the Twelfth AIMS International Conference on Management organized by AIMS International - The Association of Indian Management Scholars International and Indian Institute Management Kozhikode. The conference is also supported by the International Forum of Management Scholars. The mission of Association of Indian Management Scholars International is to unify Indian management scholars to foster excellence in education and research, to advance knowledge, and support practice in all business and related disciplines. It organizes professional conferences, publishes a journal, and has embarked upon many other professional activities.

 

IIM Kozhikode

The Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode (IIMK) is one of the 13 Indian Institutes of Management set up by the Government of India. The Institute, founded in 1996 in collaboration with the State Government of Kerala, was the 5th IIM to be established. The Institute conducts a full range of academic activities in the field of management education covering research, teaching, and training, consulting and intellectual infrastructure development. The Institute emphasises development of analytical skills and a focus on global and cross-cultural issues with a balance between business demands and social concerns.

 

Kozhikode

 

Kozhikode, also known as Calicut, is a city in the state of Kerala in southern India on the Malabar Coast. Kozhikode is the third largest city in Kerala and is part of the second largest urban agglomeration in Kerala with a metropolitan population. The city lies about 380 kilometers north of the state capital Thiruvananthapuram.


During classical antiquity and the Middle Ages, Kozhikode was dubbed the "City of Spices" for its role as the major trading point of eastern spices. It was the capital of an independent kingdom ruled by the Samoothiris (Zamorins) in Middle Ages and later of the erstwhile Malabar District under British rule. Arab merchants traded with the region as early as 7th century, and Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama landed at Calicut on 20 May 1498, thus opening a trade route between Europe and Malabar. A Portuguese factory and fort was intact in Kozhikode for short period (1511–1525, until the Fall of Calicut), the English landed in 1615 (constructed a trading post in 1665), followed by the French (1698) and the Dutch (1752). In 1765, Mysore captured Calicut as part of its occupation of Malabar Coast. Calicut, once a famous cotton-weaving center, gave its name to the Calico cloth.


On 7 June 2012, Calicut was given the tag of "City of Sculptures" (Shilpa Nagaram) because of the various architectural sculptures located in various parts of the city.
 

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